Job Hunting Advice

Job Hunting Advice

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By: Meg Guiseppi
If you're not familiar with a career biography, think of it as an article written about you in "third person," for use on a Website or where ever an article about you might appear. Your resume plus your career bio are the foundation for your career brand marketing and online presence, positioning your unique promise of value over your competition. Today's career biography is not the stodgy, boring document you may have seen or used in the past. Energized with personal branding, your bio can be an interesting, vibrant journey through career highlights.
By: Shelly B. Goldman
In a highly competitive job market, scoring an interview with a hiring company can be an accomplishment in itself. Nice work! Now that you’ve secured the job interview, it’s time to prepare. In order to make your mark, you need to make yourself memorable — and for the right reasons. Being able to emphasize and communicate your best and most relevant skills is essential to winning the job you want.
By: Jeff Lipschultz
So you had the big interview. You prepared well, had a great conversation, and are convinced you got the job. You go home and wait for the phone to ring. When it does not ring within 24 hours, you start to wonder what is going on? What IS Going On? If you interviewed early in the process, you are likely one of the first candidates to be considered. Companies rarely select a candidate without alternatives to compare to.
By: Meg Guiseppi
Your personal brand is a vivid indication of the best you have to offer – the performance, contributions, and value your next employer can expect from you. The brand you communicate marks your career reputation and is in some respects a promise. When you carry a personal brand, your unique promise of value precedes you and has far-reaching effects throughout your job search.
By: Wendy Gelberg
A colleague, himself a self-described introvert, asked me to list my top ten tips for introverts to compare with his own. Here's the list. 1. Be visible. Use social networking and conventional networking opportunities to ensure that you're on the radar screen of those who can help or hire you. 2. Use your preference for deep relationships to listen to others and position yourself as a resource, to make networking less uncomfortable and sometimes even enjoyable.
By: Jeff Lipschultz
When searching for a new job, relationships are the most important piece of the puzzle. How you manage your interactions with people has a direct impact on the value of the relationship. This logic holds true for working with recruiters, too. When engaging recruiters in your job search, realize there are many nuances to a successful relationship. It is advantageous to know the Good, Better, and Best ways to engage a recruiter and maintain the connection long term. Getting Started
By: Susan P. Joyce
If you are using the default URL that LinkedIn assigned your profile when you create it, you don't look like a member of the "In crowd" because the default URL is full of numbers. The In crowd members have URL's that look like this: linkedin.com/in/their-name Rather than a URL like this: linkedin.com/pub/yourname/29/890/2b9/ You will look like a much more savvy LinkedIn user, and the URL will look better whenever and where every you post it. Here's how to make this change: It's easy to do:
By: Phyllis Mufson
Would you like to cut the length of time until you're back earning a paycheck? The TV program 60 MINUTES did a moving piece in early 2012 on " Platform to Employment " - a job search program that helps people who've been unemployed for years get back to work. It has elements you can duplicate to make your own search more effective, and shorter.