Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

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By: Paul A. Greenberg
Here are the 10 questions you can almost always count on in a job interview, and some helpful hints about how to respond: 1. Why did you leave your last job? If you're managing your working life as you should, the reason you left your last job is that you are trying to further your career and take the next logical occupational step. If, however, you left because you hated your job or your boss, this is not the time or place to mention that. Stay positive and demonstrate a progressive, mature attitude...
By: Martin Yate, CPC
In a tightly run job race, when the two top candidates have equal qualifications, the job offer will always go to the most intelligently enthusiastic candidate.
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Restaurant interviews usually happen once you have demonstrated that you are capable of doing the job. Consequently, an invitation to talk business over food means that you are under strong consideration. Meeting in a restaurant offers the interviewer a chance to see you in a social setting that encourages examination of the more subtle skills that play a role in work once you begin to climb the professional ladder of success .
By: CareerCast.com
You've sent out countless resumes and have finally been called in for an interview. This is the point where you can make it or break it. If you perform well, you may finally get the job you've been looking for .
By: CareerCast.com
Let’s face it: There simply isn’t a better place to meet that bright-eyed love of your life than the place where you spend most of your waking hours: at work. And as a general rule, being at work is a time when you’re showered (hopefully), you’ve already dressed to impress and you’re ready to make a good impression. What other daily event is there where you go the full nine yards to look good other than for work?
By: Jeff Lipschultz
We’ve all heard “you only get one chance to make a first impression.” Albeit true, if you start off on the wrong foot with an interviewer or recruiter, is there no recovery? Are you doomed to fail? The answer lies in how a job seeker responds to the challenge. And, there is always the last impression. Recruiters and career coaches have communicated the standards for making a good first impression for years. Face-to-Face Meetings
By: Meg Guiseppi
Creating and controlling your personal brand for potential employers is imperative these days. Social networks and the web have made it easier than ever for recruiters to do a quick search on job candidates, to either disqualify you or invite you to interview for an opening .
By: Laura DeCarlo
“What’s your greatest weakness?” is the question that no one ever quite knows how to prepare to answer . This single question has the power to determine in one swift blow whether you are a potential asset or a liability to a prospective employer . Luckily, there is a solution – prepare in advance for this dreaded question and you will tame the monster! Answering the Question Let’s take a look at what we don’t ever want to say first, and why. Never, never, never choose a weakness that demonstrates your inappropriateness for the job: “Spelling” should never be the greatest weakness of a secretary. “Dealing with difficult people” is not a good answer for a customer service or team-oriented position. "Bad with math" is the wrong weakness for accounting or analyst jobs. You get the idea...