Career Guidance

Career Guidance

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By: Chris Cancialosi
In high-risk military situations, there's no time for deliberation. You have to trust the people around you to process information and make decisions quickly, and you must execute without question. Several years ago, I was in this kind of situation. A senior officer ordered me to put my soldiers in harm's way; I braved the consequences and respectfully offered a safer, equally effective course of action. I got an earful that day. However, he accepted my recommendation, and the mission was accomplished without exposing people to unnecessary risk.
By: Les Krantz
The Jobs Rated Almanac, which debuted in 1988, is the “mother” of CareerCast.com’s “Jobs Rated” report. The new 2015 edition is an indispensable tool to help you get the biggest bang from the best and worst jobs ratings. The Almanac has been developed and contributed to by two of America’s foremost career experts: Tony Lee, Editor & Publisher of CareerCast.com, and Les Krantz, founding Editor & Publisher of the Jobs Rated Almanac.
By: Benjamin Geyerhahn
With job prospects looking up across the country, it’s truly a worker’s market. Now, instead of looking to land just any job, you can choose between a job that merely pays the bills and a job that allows you to make a difference in the world. A growing number of social ventures are making their mark. TOMS Shoes, Warby Parker, Grameen Bank, and a host of smaller companies are gaining popularity among job seekers — and for good reason.
By: Michelle Kruse
Whether you’ve been offered a job in another city or you’re simply looking to expand your search, relocating for work is a huge decision — and one that many people are faced with every day. According to a study from the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly 20 percent of Americans who moved between 2012 and 2013 did so for a job. Not sure if you’re ready to be part of that statistic? Ask yourself these six questions and you’ll be well on your way to deciding whether to call the movers or to stay put and stick it out. 1. How will a move impact your family?
By: Robert Glazer
These days, it seems like every college grad expects his degree to be a ticket to the top of an organization. While Millennials feel they have a lot to contribute — and their enthusiasm is admirable — their lofty ideas are actually impairing them in the long run. Recently, I was taking a train back from New York City with three Yale students. While discussing upcoming job possibilities, two of the students said they had interviews with McKinsey in Dubai. They felt this opportunity would place them in a more prominent position than being a typical analyst here in the U.S.
By: Melissa Cooper
Many New Year's resolution-setters have long since forgotten theirs as February winds down. But if your resolutions included career development, as well as the usual plans to lose weight, exercise and be happier, take stock of where you are in the process.
By: Patra Frame
If you read our Jobs Rated report on the best jobs for veterans and want to get started on the search process, here are some great tips. First, the good news. The unemployment rate for military retirees and those transitioning from active duty is actually lower than that of the population as a whole. And there are many vets who are successful entrepreneurs.
By: Susan P. Joyce
If you are using the default URL that LinkedIn assigned your profile when you create it, you don't look like a member of the "In crowd" because the default URL is full of numbers. The In crowd members have URL's that look like this: linkedin.com/in/their-name Rather than a URL like this: linkedin.com/pub/yourname/29/890/2b9/ You will look like a much more savvy LinkedIn user, and the URL will look better whenever and where every you post it. Here's how to make this change: It's easy to do: