Career Guidance

Career Guidance

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By: CareerCast.com
Yet another economic component the Great Recession negatively impacted shows signs of improvement. The revised, fourth-quarter 2015 GDP of 1.4% outpaced estimates and finished the year on a decided upswing. The momentum of 2015 has continued into 2016, with consumer spending up -- albeit at a small rate -- per Gallup survey data . So what does that mean for the job market?
By: CareerCast.com
Positives can and should be gleaned from improved labor market numbers, but a return to pre-recession employment percentages do not indicate a complete recovery from the worst economic slump since the Great Depression. Reintegrating workers who stopped looking or couldn't look for employment altogether is the next phase in the job market recovery, which Five Thirty Eight's Ben Casselman addresses in his column .
By: CareerCast.com
U.S. Department of Labor employment numbers for February 2016 far exceeded economist expectations. The labor market added around 242,000 jobs for the month, more than 50,000 than the month's projection. Revisions to the December and January totals were also announced Friday. Despite stock market turbulence and tumbling oil prices -- or perhaps because of those factors -- the strong February hiring numbers are the best indicator yet that the 2016 job market is friendly to seekers.
By: CareerCast.com
Despite employment gains below projections, U.S. unemployment through January 2016 is below 5% for the first time since the great recession began in 2008. The first Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) jobs report of 2016 has some other interesting information, as well. A Reuters poll of economists projected January growth around 190,000. The reported 151,000 fell below that mark, but comfortably exceeded the 100,000 barrier Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said in December were necessary each month of 2016. to stay on pace with the working-age population.
By: CareerCast.com
Life is filled with stressors – from worrying you’re going to lose your job because the company lost a big account to having a sick child at home. Much of the pressure we feel lies in the eight or so hours we spend at work. For the first time since CareerCast.com first debuted its annual Jobs Rated Most and Least Stressful Jobs report in 2009 , we asked you – the reader – to sound off on the stress factors in your own career.
By: Erik Huberman
After four years of college classes and extracurricular activities — and with that sense of accomplishment that comes with graduating — it would seem the future looks bright for college grads. But the recession hit young workers the hardest: The unemployment rate for 18- to 29-year-olds rose to 13.1 percent in 2015.
By: CareerCast.com
If you are among the millions of Americans who resolved to get a new job in 2016, count yourself part of a very large section of the population. A Marist University poll estimates 10% of all Americans with a New Year's resolution target landing a new job in the new year.
By: Mattan Griffel
Online learning is revolutionizing the way people build our careers. Comprehensive programming and design courses enable us to hone and develop new skills, make massive career shifts, and earn more money. Seems like a win-win for employees and employers alike.