September 2010: U.S. Employment Activity Declines Again

September 2010: U.S. Employment Activity Declines Again
Anonymous Thu, 11/18/2010 - 17:00
Author
CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index

Employment activity fell across the U.S. in September, dipping nearly 3% to an Index score of 99.6 overall. This is the second straight month of negative national employment activity after the job market reached a high of 106.9 in July. While this decline is relatively minor, it does push the overall rate of job growth back below 2007 levels for the first time since June, and means that unemployment is unlikely to decrease in the immediate future. That said, even though the last two months have shown a decrease in hiring, the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Index is still trending 31.2 points higher than September of last year, and 11.9 points higher than in 2008. The 2010 Index has performed better coming out of the summer months than either of the last two years, highlighting the significant gains in employment activity that have occurred since January.

Index Month Index Score Monthly Change
September 2010 99.6 -2.7
August 2010 102.3 -4.6
July 2010 106.9 +14.3
June 2010 92.6 +3.6
May 2010 89.0 -3.3
April 2010 92.3 +1.9
March 2010 90.4 +7.1
February 2010 83.3 +12.5
January 2010 70.8 -3.1
December 2009 73.9 +0.2
November 2009 73.7 +5.9
October 2009 67.8 -0.6
September 2009 68.4 -11.4
August 2009 79.8 +1.6
July 2009 78.2 +17.8
June 2009 60.4 +3.8
May 2009 56.6 +15.2
April 2009 41.4 -2.7
March 2009 44.1 -5.4
February 2009 49.5 -12.2
January 2009 61.7 -4.5
December 2008 66.2 -10.9
November 2008 77.1 +3.7
October 2008 73.4 -14.3
September 2008 87.7 -18.0
August 2008 105.7 +5.4
July 2008 100.3 -2.3
June 2008 102.6 +6.8
May 2008 95.8 +1.6
April 2008 94.2 -15.1
March 2008 109.3 +0.3
February 2008 109.0 +8.7
January 2008 100.3 +/-0

To determine monthly employment activity, the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Index surveys the volume of managerial job openings available online across the U.S., as well as the regions, job titles and major cities with the highest number of employment opportunities per capita. Results are determined using proprietary employment data from a wide range of local and national job boards, which is hand-counted and checked for duplication by a team of researchers. What does an overall Index score of 99.6 for September mean? The Index measures employment activity against a base score of 100, which represents the volume of job openings during the same period in 2007. A score higher than 100 means that there are more available jobs than in 2007, while one below 100 means that job seekers now have fewer opportunities available. Over the past 33 months, the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Index peaked in March 2008 with an index score of 109.3, or 9.3 points better than in March 2007. This month's score of 99.6, on the other hand, means that after two months of improved performance, employment activity is once again below 2007 levels, trailing the base measurement by 0.4 points.

 

Career Topics
Employment Trends

September 2010: Employment Activity by U.S. Region

September 2010: Employment Activity by U.S. Region Anonymous Thu, 11/18/2010 - 17:20

September 2010: Employment Activity by Job Title

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September 2010: The 10 Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job

September 2010: The 10 Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job
Anonymous Thu, 11/18/2010 - 17:00
Author
CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index

To determine the cities with the 10 best and worst job markets each month, the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Index surveys 30 different major metro areas across the U.S. in order to determine their per capita job availability. Rather than simply reporting the cities with the most and least jobs, the Index measures the number of job openings relative to population. This gives a more complete picture of how easy (or difficult) it is to get a new job in each metro area.

September saw little change among the 10 best cities for finding a job, although just one of last month's two new additions managed to remain on the list. After an impressive surge to 9th place in August, Cleveland lost ground again and finished outside the top 10. Washington, D.C., on the other hand, continued its dominance and now has the highest score any city has recorded since the Index began collecting data.

Want to know where the jobs are? Check out these 10 cities, which offer candidates the best chance of finding new employment in the U.S.

Career Topics
Employment Trends

September 2010: The 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

September 2010: The 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job Anonymous Thu, 11/18/2010 - 17:20