December 2011: Hiring Levels Drop

December 2011: Hiring Levels Drop
CareerCast.com Wed, 12/28/2011 - 12:52
Author
CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index

Employment Activity Drops Sharply in December

 

       As the holiday bustle rose in December, hiring levels fell 8.4 points, according to the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index. This seasonal decline landed the employment index at 95.1 in December and -4.8 points behind activity levels of last December. The overall index is still trending positively as managerial hiring activity is nearly 30 points higher than it was in December, 2008.

How do we determine these numbers?

The CareerCast.com/JobSerf The CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index calculates the number of available managerial job openings each month by surveying wide range of local and national job boards across the U.S, with all results hand-counted and checked for duplication by a team of researchers. What does an overall Index score of 95.1 for December 2011 mean? The Index measures employment activity against a base score of 100, which represents the volume of job openings during the same period in 2007. A score higher than 100 means that there are more available jobs than in 2007, while one below 100 means that job seekers now have fewer opportunities available. The CareerCast.com / JobSerf  Index is lower at 95.1 than it was in December of 2007.

                                  

Index Month Index Score Monthly Change
December 2011 95.1 -8.4
November 2011 103.5 -0.9
October 2011 104.4 +1.9
September 2011 102.6 -5.0
August 2011 107.6 +9.4
July 2011 98.2 -2.1
June 2011 100.3 -0.2
May 2011 100.5 -10.1
April 2011 110.6 +1.1
March 2011 109.5 +5.2
February 2011 104.3 +0.6
January 2011 103.7 +3.8
December 2010 99.9 -6.0
November 2010 105.9 +6.4
October 2010 99.5 -0.1
September 2010 99.6 -2.7
August 2010 102.3 -4.6
July 2010 106.9 +14.3
June 2010 92.6 +3.6
May 2010 89.0 -3.3
April 2010 92.3 +1.9
March 2010 90.4 +7.1
February 2010 83.3 +12.5
January 2010 70.8 -3.1
December 2009 73.9 +0.2
November 2009 73.7 +5.9
October 2009 67.8 -0.6
September 2009 68.4 -11.4
August 2009 79.8 +1.6
July 2009 78.2 +17.8
June 2009 60.4 +3.8
May 2009 56.6 +15.2
April 2009 41.4 -2.7
March 2009 44.1 -5.4
February 2009 49.5 -12.2
January 2009 61.7 -4.5
December 2008 66.2 -10.9
November 2008 77.1 +3.7
October 2008 73.4 -14.3
September 2008 87.7 -18.0
August 2008 105.7 +5.4
July 2008 100.3 -2.3
June 2008 102.6 +6.8
May 2008 95.8 +1.6
April 2008 94.2 -15.1
March 2008 109.3 +0.3
February 2008 109.0 +8.7
January 2008 100.3 +/-0

 

Although the drop in job activity across the country seems to match with historically slow hiring levels in December, the index hit its lowest level in 18-months to 95.1. This drop could be a result of the prolonged budget discussion by Congress, which had a direct effect on Federal hiring.

Year-over-year hiring is still trending much higher with a gain of 21.2 points from 2009 and 28.9 in 2008. April saw the highest index level of 110.6 for 2011 and for the history of the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment report.

Continue to the December 2011 Job Title Hiring Report

Career Topics
Employment Trends

December 2011: Employment Activity by Job Title

December 2011: Employment Activity by Job Title CareerCast.com Wed, 12/28/2011 - 12:59

December 2011: The 10 Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job

December 2011: The 10 Best and Worst Cities to Find a Job
CareerCast.com Wed, 12/28/2011 - 13:32
Author
CareerCast.com/JobSerf Employment Index

While hiring from city-to-city varied in December, Memphis (+19%), Tampa (+16%), and Miami (+19%) saw the job market heating up with double digit gains in hiring levels. Washington, D.C., a strong employment stalwart, dropped dramatically with a 26-point slide to 139, its lowest level since December 2010. New York City (-8%), Chicago (-6%) and Milwaukee (-8%) also saw hiring opportunities decline in December.

To determine the cities with the 10 best and worst job markets each month, the CareerCast.com/JobSerf Index surveys 30 different major metro areas across the U.S. for per capita job availability. Rather than simply reporting the cities with the most and least jobs, the Index measures the number of job openings relative to population. This gives a more complete picture of how easy (or difficult) it is to get a new job in each metro area.

Want to know where the jobs are right now? Check out December 2011’s 10 Best Cities for Finding a New Job:

Rank City Score Ranking Change
1 Washington, D.C. 139 +/-0
2 Boston, MA 123 +/-0
3 San Francisco 106 +/-0
4 Seattle 98 +/-0
5 Baltimore 82 +/-0
6 Atlanta 79 +/-0
7 Nashville 76 +1
8 Chicago 75 -1
9 Denver 67 +1
10 New York 66 -1

 

Continue to December’s 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

Career Topics
Employment Trends

December 2011: The 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

December 2011: The 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job

As employment shows signs of recovery, there are still pockets of cities where the turnaround is much slower.

If you want to relocate but are worried about moving to a bad job market, take note of these metro areas, which make up December 2011’s 10 Worst Cities to Find a Job:

CareerCast.com Wed, 12/28/2011 - 13:38