Job Hunting Advice

Job Hunting Advice

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By: Wendy Gelberg
A colleague, himself a self-described introvert, asked me to list my top ten tips for introverts to compare with his own. Here's the list. 1. Be visible. Use social networking and conventional networking opportunities to ensure that you're on the radar screen of those who can help or hire you. 2. Use your preference for deep relationships to listen to others and position yourself as a resource, to make networking less uncomfortable and sometimes even enjoyable.More
By: Jeff Lipschultz
When searching for a new job, relationships are the most important piece of the puzzle. How you manage your interactions with people has a direct impact on the value of the relationship. This logic holds true for working with recruiters, too. When engaging recruiters in your job search, realize there are many nuances to a successful relationship. It is advantageous to know the Good, Better, and Best ways to engage a recruiter and maintain the connection long term. Getting StartedMore
By: Susan P. Joyce
If you are using the default URL that LinkedIn assigned your profile when you create it, you don't look like a member of the "In crowd" because the default URL is full of numbers. The In crowd members have URL's that look like this: linkedin.com/in/their-name Rather than a URL like this: linkedin.com/pub/yourname/29/890/2b9/ You will look like a much more savvy LinkedIn user, and the URL will look better whenever and where every you post it. Here's how to make this change: It's easy to do:More
By: Phyllis Mufson
Would you like to cut the length of time until you're back earning a paycheck? The TV program 60 MINUTES did a moving piece in early 2012 on " Platform to Employment " - a job search program that helps people who've been unemployed for years get back to work. It has elements you can duplicate to make your own search more effective, and shorter.More
By: Wendy Gelberg
What does it take to land a job? A recently successful job seeker described her strategy for finding a job - not just any job, but the one she really wanted, with the organization she most wanted to work for. Her approach is worth sharing, because it focuses on some of the things that introverts do best. Target your search Our successful job seeker abandoned her initial broadly focused "I'll take anything" attitude, and narrowed her search based on in-depth research and exploration. That's something introverts typically excel at.More
By: Susan P. Joyce
Most resumes end up in a database of some sort: in the resume database of a job board, in an employer's applicant tracking system, in social networks like LinkedIn and Google Plus, or even in a recruiter's email inbox. Regardless of where they are stored, those resumes and social profiles need to be "find-able" when someone types in their search terms. Those search terms are commonly called "keywords." Your 25 Best KeywordsMore
By: Susan P. Joyce
You had job interviews at a place you’d like to work. The interviews seemed to go well. Maybe one of the interviewers said they looked forward to working with you. But, not a word from them since then. The recruiter/HR person/hiring manager said they’d make a decision before the end of last week. Or by the middle of last week. Or before the end of last month. Or some other time in the past. Their own deadline has passed — maybe days or weeks (even months) ago. But, you haven’t heard from them. And, you may never hear from them. Or, you may hear from them tomorrow...More
By: Susan P. Joyce
You've received the dreaded "thank-you-for-your-interest-but..." letter, and you really wanted that job. Maybe you were the number 2 or number 3 candidate. Close, but no cigar. Dang! What now? Move on to the next opportunity, right? Of course. But first... Try turning that rejection letter on its head! Convert it into an opportunity. Maybe. Send a Thank You NoteMore