Job Hunting Advice: Resume Writing

Job Hunting Advice: Resume Writing

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The Right Stuff For a Successful Resume
By: Peter Weddle
Most of us view writing a resume as just slightly better than doing our taxes. But in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. While your tax filing indicates what the Government is going to take from you, your resume describes what you've brought to your career .More
By: Peter Weddle
A recent survey found that over a third of HR professionals have visited social networking sites to look for information about employment candidates. Personal info and videos posted on Facebook , Twitter , YouTube and other sites are now considered fair game when employers conduct "background checks" on job seekers.More
By: Peter Weddle
Resume writing sucks. Unless you're a masochist (or a professional resume writer), developing a resume is an experience that most resembles a root canal. We tolerate the process, however, because we believe that a correctly-formatted resume will help us snag a new or better job. However, that's simply not true. In fact, most employers see your resume as a ticket to nowhere .More
Lazy Job Seekers are Kidding Themselves
By: Peter Weddle
I've been unemployed in my career. Twice. So what I'm about to say is based as much on personal experience as it is on a lifetime of studying the best practices in managing a successful career . There is a single, profound truth for all job seekers: if you think conducting a job search will be quick and easy, you're only kidding yourself. It won't.More
By: Douglas B. Richardson, Certified Master Coach
You all know the rules: your resume should not burden the reader. It should never exceed two pages, and must be easy to scan during that first 30-second once-over by an overburdened, uncharitable screener. It should hit the high points, set the hook and leave elaboration of the fine points to your face-to-face interviews.More
By: Bill Broderick
Back in the 1950's, a Time Magazine reporter interviewed a world-famous pianist about his work. The reporter asked: "What's most challenging about playing the piano?" The pianist thought for a moment and replied: "I do OK with the notes, but the spaces between the notes give me lots of trouble." What he meant, of course, was that he was very competent at the mechanics of playing the piano, but found the subtlety and nuance of making music, getting the "spaces between the notes" right, a continual life-long challenge.More
frustrated man with crumpled pieces of paper
By: Taunee Besson, CMF, CareerCast.com Senior Columnist
To give yourself an advantage in the screening process, your first priority should be to concentrate on each job opening and create an email (or letter if you prefer) that speaks to the requirements the company hopes to fill. Here are suggestions for encouraging a recruiter to put your correspondence at the top of the interview pile .More
By: Taunee Besson, CMF, CareerCast.com Senior Columnist
Responding to all job listings with your one, perfect resume is a sure way to commit job-search suicide, even if you've created a tailored cover letter. Potential employers want to know specifically what you can do for them, so if you craft your resume for each opening, the screener is more likely to note the difference and give you the opportunity to talk in person. Here are some time-tested guidelines for writing a tailored resume:More