Job Hunting Advice: Resume Writing

Job Hunting Advice: Resume Writing

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By: Michelle Kruse
You have positioned yourself well since graduating high school. You got solid grades in college, scored the internship of your dreams, and gleaned enough experience to create a masterpiece: your resume. As the years have passed and jobs have come and gone, you’ve continued adding to the original document, bringing it to its current state. Which, if we’re being honest, may not be as impressive as it once was.More
By: Meg Guiseppi
If you're not familiar with a career biography, think of it as an article written about you in "third person," for use on a Website or where ever an article about you might appear. Your resume plus your career bio are the foundation for your career brand marketing and online presence, positioning your unique promise of value over your competition. Today's career biography is not the stodgy, boring document you may have seen or used in the past. Energized with personal branding, your bio can be an interesting, vibrant journey through career highlights.More
By: Susan P. Joyce
Most resumes end up in a database of some sort: in the resume database of a job board, in an employer's applicant tracking system, in social networks like LinkedIn and Google Plus, or even in a recruiter's email inbox. Regardless of where they are stored, those resumes and social profiles need to be "find-able" when someone types in their search terms. Those search terms are commonly called "keywords." Your 25 Best KeywordsMore
By: Michelle Kruse
Everyone likes to think they're special. So why not communicate that to potential employers with your resume? Applicants have used Vine videos, infographics, and even candy wrappers to replace the standard CV. In a competitive job market, creative resumes are a great way to show off your design skills and stand out from other applicants. Unfortunately, they're also a great way to annoy recruiters who are attempting to sift through hundreds of other resumes. When it comes down to it, it really just depends on the situation. Where Are You Applying?More
By: Peter Weddle
If you’ve been in the workforce for more than ten minutes you know all about Best Practices. Over the years, these procedures have been tested and proven effective in virtually every profession, craft and trade. And, there’s the rub. Best Practices are what worked in the past. Next Practices are what will work going forward. That’s why in a job search, it’s best to use what’s going to be effective next in writing your resume.More
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Most people don't think about updating their resumes until they find themselves out of work and in desperate need of a job. Job security is now a thing of the past, so we all need to think more carefully about job change and how that impacts our financial security. Uncertainty is the only certainty these days, so whether it is just time for a change or cutbacks are in the wind, maintaining a current a resume is simply a smart career management strategy that keeps you ready for disaster or opportunity. Three smart resume maintenance strategiesMore
By: Martin Yate, CPC
If you want your resume to succeed in today’s world of database-driven recruitment, you have three major considerations: 1. Your resume needs to be data-dense to be found in database searches. 2. Your resume needs to be succinct and focused on a specific target job. 3. Your resume needs to be visually accessible and readable Resumes: Focus and Data-DensityMore
By: Martin Yate, CPC
A resume is the primary tool that all professionals use to define and disseminate their professional brand to an ever-expanding world of contacts. Long-term success— rewarding work without layoffs, and professional growth that fits your goals—is much easier to achieve when you are credible and visible within your profession.More