Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

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By: Martin Yate, CPC
Headhunters and human resources professionals ask two critical questions prior to any kind of interview: Do you have the skills for the job, and are you suitable for the company?More
By: Sheryl Silver
So did you finally finish your resume? It probably took hours to do a first draft then an edited version trimming the document to two pages. Then, if you heeded the advice of outplacement consultants to make sure your resume was error-free, you probably took a bit more time to proofread it. The question is: Have you invested as much time preparing for your "live" conversations with interested employers? If you're like a lot of people, you haven't --- and that can undermine all the work you put into creating a great resume.More
By: Karen Burns, NWJobs.com
If you've been job hunting for any length of time, you undoubtedly understand the importance of compelling cover letters, snazzy resumes, knock-'em-dead interviews, the all-important thank-you note and -- of course -- networking. However, if you've been pounding the pavement for longer than you would like, you might be starting to suspect that there's another, less talked-about element to the successful job search Like, for instance, luck.More
By: Kyle Kensing
Job interview anxiety is perfectly normal. After all, the interview is one of the major gateways to a new career. Job seekers can alleviate some of their tension by identifying exactly which facet of the interview elevates their blood pressure the most. We asked Facebook and Twitter users to respond to CareerCast.com’s social media query: Which part of a job interview do you find most challenging? The responses had a unifying theme.More
By: Karen Burns, NWJobs.com
Most of the time in a job interview, interviewers are reasonably competent and you will not need to manage your job interviews. Your biggest problem will be managing yourself! Let's be honest: Interviewing for a job is stressful, especially in a tough job market. And the longer you're out of work, the more stressful it is.More
Choose The Right Company
By: Martin Yate, CPC
It’s one thing to get a job offer, but another to decide if the job is right for you. You wouldn’t be the first person to accept a job without thinking only to realize, once the honeymoon was over, that you had made a terrible mistake. Wouldn’t it be great if you could ask questions that would raise red flags about a potential bad fit, perhaps averting a catastrophe? Asking the right questions now can increase the chances that your next strategic career move will be smart professionally and a fulfilling experience personally. You will want to evaluate:More
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Telephone interviews are usually short, just long enough to rule you in or out, and so an interviewer’s focus will be on questions that help evaluate you as quickly as possible. Your goal is to turn this telephone screening into a face-to-face meeting .More
By: Paul A. Greenberg
Here are the 10 questions you can almost always count on in a job interview, and some helpful hints about how to respond: 1. Why did you leave your last job? If you're managing your working life as you should, the reason you left your last job is that you are trying to further your career and take the next logical occupational step. If, however, you left because you hated your job or your boss, this is not the time or place to mention that. Stay positive and demonstrate a progressive, mature attitude...More