Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

Job Hunting Advice: Job Interviews

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By: Susan P. Joyce
You had job interviews at a place you’d like to work. The interviews seemed to go well. Maybe one of the interviewers said they looked forward to working with you. But, not a word from them since then. The recruiter/HR person/hiring manager said they’d make a decision before the end of last week. Or by the middle of last week. Or before the end of last month. Or some other time in the past. Their own deadline has passed — maybe days or weeks (even months) ago. But, you haven’t heard from them. And, you may never hear from them. Or, you may hear from them tomorrow...More
By: Susan P. Joyce
You've received the dreaded "thank-you-for-your-interest-but..." letter, and you really wanted that job. Maybe you were the number 2 or number 3 candidate. Close, but no cigar. Dang! What now? Move on to the next opportunity, right? Of course. But first... Try turning that rejection letter on its head! Convert it into an opportunity. Maybe. Send a Thank You NoteMore
By: Art Koff
Unfortunately, many job seekers make mistakes during their job interviews that cost them the opportunity. This is particularly true for those who have been out of work for some time. The following tips should offer you the best opportunity of receiving the consideration you deserve if your background and skills are a match for the opening. Follow them, and you should be line for the job (or at least a second interview): 1: Interview with a temp firm or staffing organization prior to interviewing with an employer.More
By: CareerCast.com
Every autumn, front lawns are decorated with scarecrows, plastic skeletons and nylon cobwebs. But if those setting out Halloween decorations wanted to truly frighten passersby, they would build a pretend office and re-enact job interviews from years past. For many of us, nothing quickens the heart rate or sends a chill down our spines like a job interview. Career counselors often say to expect nightmares and an increased fear of dying the night before a job interview.More
By: Michelle Kruse
A behavioral interview can be one of the more cringe-inducing aspects of the job search process. It's never easy being judged, yet that's what a behavioral interview is all about. An employer needs to know how a candidate will respond under pressure once they're on the job, thus the worst thing you can do is to enter your interview nervous and fidgety. Start by preparing yourself for the types of questions you may be asked -- and the best possible answers -- and then take a deep breath and walk in confidently. Why the use of the behavioral interview?More
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Building a successful career is a marathon, not a sprint and you are just at the starting line. As a new hire, your role is to get acclimated over the first few days and observe the flow of work. Whatever apparent madness you think you see in the early days at your first company, there is usually some very sound method behind it. The paychecks don't bounce, so the company’s seasoned employees and officers must be doing something right.More
By: Kelly Gregorio
The fact that you are job-less is perplexing. You have a promising resume, solid recommendations and a real drive to get the job, any job, done. You're enthusiastic, committed and just need a chance to prove yourself. So why hasn't anyone caught on to your stellar employment potential? Chances are, because you're letting them pass you by.More
By: Sampurna Majumder
Dealing with rejection in your job search can be very difficult, especially if rejection is a typical response. Add in that most job hunts involve a long, tiring process, and it's common for fatigue to set in. The key to success is to avoid getting depressed by staying positive.More