Career Guidance: Salary & Benefits

Career Guidance: Salary & Benefits

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By: Tim Cannon
I’ve heard far too many stories about employees leaving a company they loved for one offering a higher salary and disliking their new position or work culture. I’ll admit, it’s hard to ignore the dollar signs when a better offer comes your way. And many professionals feel they deserve a higher pay than what they currently make. In fact, the ... More
By: CareerCast.com
One common, simple goal among job seekers is landing the position that can earn the most money. And it's true that at the most fundamental level, the reason any of us works is to earn income. However, pay alone should not supersede all factors when considering a career move. Everyone's probably heard the adage money cannot buy happiness at least ... More
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Promotions come as a result of hard work, credibility, visibility, and a plan of action to gain experience and credentials. You get hired based on credentials, not potential, and you get promoted for the same reasons. It is often simpler to get promoted with the company where you work, than trying to get a promotion with a job change. This is because you have time to build the skills and the allies with a current employer who will help you with that step up. Strategy – Promotions Don’t Come To Those Who WaitMore
By: Veer Gidwaney
Looking for a job means compromising. You probably will not find the perfect position in the perfect location with the perfect salary (unless you’re offered a job at Google). But you should not compromise benefits. Although most of us look at a starting salary and get big green dollar signs in our eyes, benefits boil down to more than just being able to afford a doctor. Believe it or not, benefits are actually a better predictor for enjoying your job than salary alone.More
By: Dr. Morley D. Glicken
Should you ask for a raise during bad economic times? The answer is yes, but only if you deserve a raise and you've developed a carefully thought-through strategy. Even in bad times, asking for more money likely can tell you where you stand within your company and what the future might hold. Abby is a CPA in Kansas City working for an auto parts company. Her work is demanding, and while she enjoys her job and her co-workers, her salary is about $12,000 less a year than what the men in her company make who have the same amount of experience and tenure and do similar work.More
By: Martin Yate, CPC
Ask for too much and you might not get an offer; ask for too little and you could be kicking yourself for years. Under-negotiating your salary today has an impact on your lifetime earnings, because all future raises will be based on a lower starting point. Fortunately, the correct answer can be found with a little research and a simple negotiation strategy .More
By: Taunee Besson, CMF, CareerCast.com Senior Columnist
Question: Last week you talked about preparing a compensation negotiation . I have followed your advice and have developed a logical reason why I deserve greater compensation , researched and determined a specific request, and chosen a good time for all concerned. Now what do I do?More
By: Daneen Skube
Q. I want to get a raise but also realize that I’m lucky to have a job. Are there rules about negotiating a raise? A. In coaching people, I’ve discovered that they fall into two categories of salary negotiators. People in the first group want more money but haven’t earned it. Those in the second group want more money and are worth twice what they’re earning but are scared to ask. If you fall into the first group, your job is to realize you...More